Wetherspoon pubs run out of SALT as supply chain crisis hits UK

Wetherspoons runs out of SALT: Diners left furious as their meals are ruined and they’re forced to eat ‘unseasoned fish and chips’

  • Fuming pub lovers hit out as JD Wetherspoon venues across UK run out of salt 
  • Customers in both Kent and Manchester took to Twitter to vent their frustration
  • Low salt stock becomes the latest supply chain crisis to strike at the pub chain
  • Last month, Wetherspoon bosses apologised after running low on certain lagers

Unimpressed punters were left to eat unseasoned pub lunches this week after JD Wetherspoon venues across the country ran out of salt.

Pub lovers across the UK bemoaned the lack of available sachets in the latest supply chain crisis to strike at the popular chain. 

Last month, Wetherspoon bosses apologised after a handful of its 671 pubs ran out of Carling and Coors lager, owing to the national shortage of 100,000 hauliers.

The chain pointed the finger at ‘supplier disruption’, with new food providers being sought to alleviate the pressure on existing stock shortages.

This week, one person took the Twitter and joked: ‘No sugar in Greggs, no salt in Wetherspoons. Country has gone to the dogs.’

Another person who ate at Wetherspoon Piccadilly, Manchester, complained of having to eat ‘unseasoned’ fish and chips. 

Pub lovers across the UK bemoaned the lack of available sachets at JD Wetherspoon pubs in the latest supply chain crisis to strike at the popular chain. Pictured: A Wetherspoon venue in Littlehampton, West Sussex

Punters took to Twitter to complain of a salt shortage in JD Wetherspoon pubs across the UK

Punters across the country have complained of the impact the salt shortage was having on their favourite meals.

One pubgoer in Piccadilly, Manchester said they had to settle for vinegar when tucking into their weekly fish and chips.

They said: ‘It just wasn’t the same, my chips were ruined.’ 

Another Wetherspoon customer in Rochester, Kent was told salt sachets hadn’t been on delivery lorries for a fortnight. 

Teresa Curtis said her family had experienced the salt shortage, with signs being put up in certain pubs because of supply issues.

Nicky Ford tweeted: ‘Apparently you now have to take your own salt to Wetherspoons now, haven’t had any salt all week.’ 

The popular pub chain blamed ‘supplier disruption’ for its lack of salt, with new food providers being sought to alleviate the pressure on existing stock shortages

Earlier this month, Wetherspoon recorded its biggest loss on record after suffering heavily from Covid-19 restrictions – losing more than £150million last year

Dom Webb, co-owner of Wetherspoon-themed Instagram influencer account @webberspoons, shared his disappointment: ‘I don’t think this is good enough. It’s disappointing from such a reputable high street pub chain.’

Wetherspoon spokesman Eddie Gershon said: ‘There is a supplier disruption for salt sachets and Wetherspoon pubs are currently running short of salt in some pubs and in others have no salt sachets at all.

‘We are working with our supplier to resolve this as soon as possible.’

Earlier this month, Wetherspoon recorded its biggest loss on record after suffering heavily from Covid-19 restrictions – losing more than £150million last year.

The company has only seen losses in three of its 37 years – in 1984, 2020 and 2021 – but the 12 months to July 25 were its worst to date.

The chain sunk to a pre-tax loss of £154.7million, up from £34.1million a year ago, while sales were down from £1.26billion to £772.6million.

Stock shortages have plagued high street retailers, hospitality venues and supermarkets in Britain all summer.

Jonathan Neame, chief executive of Shepherd Neame, warned of ‘terrific supply chain squeezes’ on the industry that are expected to last for the next six to nine months. 

Experts have claimed the shortage is due to a combination of factors including EU employees returning home after Brexit and lockdown restrictions causing the cancellation of 40,000 HGV tests. They also cited poor wages and the closure of a tax loophole for some drivers.

The crisis is also hitting British tourism, as hoteliers and bar owners try to manage a surge in holidaymakers as people opt for vacations at home than abroad, and staff shortages caused by a rising number of Covid infections and a recruitment slump post-Brexit.

Even schools are being warned to stock up on food for hot meals, with Federation of Wholesale Distributors communications chief David Visick warning September is going to be ‘incredibly challenging for food distributors who are struggling to find enough delivery drivers’.

Source: Read Full Article