Mayoral voters’ No. 1 concern is public safety — why can’t the left get it?

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The latest NY1/Ipsos poll shows nearly 46 percent of likely voters say crime and public safety should be the top priority of the next mayor, up seven points from the same poll in April. That should be a shock only to the city’s liberals, who never seem to realize that the voters above all else want to be safe.

The survey also shows big gains for Eric Adams, the mayoral candidate who’s stood firmest on the need to fight crime: He’s now well ahead of the pack, at 22 percent, having surged six points ahead of No. 2 Andrew Yang after trailing him by nine points in the April poll.

Notably, neither Yang nor No. 3 Kathryn Garcia is pushing a soft-on-crime agenda, unlike most of the truly laggard candidates.

Who can blame New Yorkers for being concerned about the rise in crime when shootings citywide have surged by more than 68 percent in the first half of 2021, per NYPD figures — with the hot summer months still to come?

In an ugly tweet, radical-left candidate Maya Wiley blamed cops for failing to prevent the tragic death of 10-year-old Justin Wallace in Queens, pretending that the effort to restore sanity in Washington Square Park was somehow to blame for the boy’s murder.

Plainly, the “Defund” crew is completely out of touch with the lives of ordinary New Yorkers. Then again, as The Post’s Julia Marsh reported, Wiley’s ritzy $2.7 million home is being protected by a private security patrol in her Brooklyn neighborhood even as she vows to slash the NYPD budget. Talk about “privilege.”

Most New Yorkers want safety for all, not just for the rich, and we expect they’ll start sending that message as soon as early voting begins and all the way through to the June 22 primary.

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