Ghostly myth of HMS Friday ‘that set sail on 13th and was never seen again’

As today marks Friday the 13th, with it comes the urban legend of HMS Friday – a ship that set sail on the superstitious day only to never be seen or heard from again.

The bone-chilling tale began in the 1800s, made up by sailors who were notoriously superstitious about beginning voyages on a Friday as it was certain to bring bad luck.

According to legend, the British Royal Navy tried to dispel the sailors myth and built a ship named Her Majesty’s Ship Friday.

Building for the vessel is said to have begun on a Friday, crew selected on a Friday, and was even under the command of Captain James Friday.

All was well until HMS Friday set sail on her maiden voyage on Friday the 13th, only to never be seen or heard from again, legend says.

It's a tale is as old as time and continues to be told by those wanting to overcome the superstitions connected to Friday 13th.

Friday 13th is considered an unlucky day in Western superstition, and occurs when the 13th day of the month falls on a Friday.

It occurs at least once a year, but can fall up to three times in the same year on the Gregorian calendar.

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As for HMS Friday, none of it is true.

In a bid to squash the Friday rumours themselves, the Royal Navy debunked it, denying HMS Friday ever existed.

According to The Royal Navy Museum, there has never been a Royal Navy ship named HMS Friday, or a ship named after any other day of the week for that matter.

On its website, the Royal Navy Museum states: "Sailors certainly are superstitious – something to do with being at the mercy of such an unpredictable element as the sea and who would want to give up a weekend ashore.

"But we can confirm that there has never been a Royal Navy ship named HMS Friday – or after any other day of the week for that matter."

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