Kelly Loeffler says 2022 rematch with Raphael Warnock 'certainly on the table'

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Georgia native Jeremy Hunt says a vote for the left in the Senate runoffs is a vote to supplant American culture with a new unrecognizable version of itself.

Former Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-GA, is thinking about challenging Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in a 2022 rematch for her old seat.

Loeffler told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Monday that a 2022 campaign is “certainly on the table,” though she declined to commit to running.

Former Sen. David Perdue, R-GA, announced on Tuesday that he won’t run against Warnock in 2022, helping clear the way for a potential Loeffler candidacy. 

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Loeffler said her focus right now is on Greater Georgia, the voter outreach organization she launched Monday to rival Stacey Abrams’ political machine in the state. 

“I don’t know if any Republican can win if we don’t shore up what we’re doing around voter registration, engagement, and election integrity,” she told the Atlanta paper.

Greater Georgia is styled as the GOP foil to Stacey Abrams’ Fair Fight political machine and will work to advance “election transparency and uniformity” as well as “big tent” Republican policies.

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Loeffler’s path to a rematch with Warnock could still face another hurdle: her 2020 primary rival, former Rep. Doug Collins, has not said whether or not he’ll seek Warnock’s seat.

Collins and Loeffler traded blows in a heated Republican Senate primary in 2020, with Loeffler eventually beating Collins by a six-point margin to take on Warnock.

Loeffler pointed to her primary win over Collins in the interview with the Journal-Constitution, saying that she appreciated his “work” during the runoff with Warnock, but warning that Republicans working with Democrats to “attack other Republicans” would hurt the party “up and down the ticket.”

Loeffler — who was originally appointed to the Senate after former Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-GA, resigned from his seat — also pointed out that the GOP had “no answer” to Abrams’ organization and that they would need one to see future success in Georgia.

“Right now there is no answer on the Republican side to a comprehensive platform that provides the resources, the scale, the network, the message, the communications platform that we need for statewide success in 2022 and beyond,” Loeffler said. 

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