Welcome to Your Week. Let’s talk Pride. 🏳️‍🌈

No aliens. For now.

A highly anticipated Pentagon report on UFOs did not find evidence that the unexplained aerial phenomena witnessed by Navy pilots in recent years were alien spacecrafts. But the government also did not definitively say they weren’t alien spacecrafts (many of their qualities remain a mystery!)

That being said, scientists aren’t giving up the search for extraterrestrials, USA TODAY’s Doyle Rice and Grace Hauck report.

“We are in the most exciting moment in the history of the search for intelligent life,” said Adam Frank, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester. “Now we know where and how to look for it.”

I’m Alex, your human guide to Earth news. This is Your Week, the best of USA TODAY’s subscriber-only content.

🌎Before we land:

  • Jeff Bezos and his brother, Mark, will ride on the first human flight of New Shepard in July. 
  • Is life on Venus a possibility? NASA announced two upcoming missions to study the planet.

We wrote some really great stories this week and last:

  • The real issue with the COVID-19 lab leak theory: The US isn’t spying on China like it used to.
  • The FDA approved a treatment doctors say is the most effective weight loss drug on the market. But can it really make a difference?
  • Vaccines 2.0: Industry leaders say the next-generation COVID-19 shots will be cheaper, easier to deliver and will protect against more variants.
  • U.S. aid to Israel was always a given. Will growing support for Palestinians change that?
  • Parents desperately need child care.But day cares are struggling to retain workers.
  • Corporate America is reopening its offices as the pandemic wanes. But many workers won’t be there.
  • It’s been 40 years since the first reported cases of AIDS. While treatments have come a long way, a vaccine remains elusive.

A collage of four images, from left to right: Vice President Kamala Harris, the planet Venus, a Pride celebration, Dr. Anthony Fauci. (Photo: USA TODAY)

‘If your Pride isn’t intersectional, it’s not Pride’

A lot has happened this past year in the LGBTQ+ community, from the pandemic disrupting Pride celebrations to anti-trans legislation being introduced nationwide and more. I spoke with David Oliver, USA TODAY’s entertainment reporter covering diversity and inclusion, on how intersectionality has informed his Pride coverage this year.

Q: How do you balance your reporting on both the issues the community is facing as well as the joy and celebration it is experiencing?

A: “I read this somewhere once and have adopted it myself: if your Pride isn’t intersectional, it’s not Pride. We owe Pride to the courage of Black and Latina transgender women, full stop. When we started putting together plans for Pride coverage, we wanted to emphasize the transgender community as much as possible. To your point, anti-trans legislation has been rampant in the U.S., but the trans community has faced persecution far beyond this moment. They’ve celebrated wins and found joy anyway — something audiences need to be reminded of, as well as trans folks themselves. That’s part of why we mixed LGBTQ coverage this year — as we should each year — with ongoing issues regarding legislation and the Supreme Court, as well as ways the community lifts each other up in difficult times and the happiness that comes from identifying as LGBTQ. We are here, we are queer and we support all colors and creeds. It is and should always be this simple.”

LGBTQ+ coverage you can’t miss:

  • The first Pride was a protest. For LGBTQ activists, action is still the priority.
  • Why Rainbow Capitalism can be harmful to the LGBTQ community: “It remains purely symbolic.”
  • LGBTQ Pride flags go beyond the classic rainbow. Here’s what each one means.
  • These trans and nonbinary teens hope their books will enlighten the world during Pride.
  • The Equality Act could soon be getting a vote in the Senate. What are its chances?

The best subscriber-only stories

MIGRATION | Vice President Kamala Harris will visit Guatemala and Mexico this week, where she’ll meet this week with foreign leaders, community organizers and entrepreneurs in hopes of forging partnerships to help stem migration to the U.S. The two-day jaunt will test Harris’ diplomatic and negotiating skills as she looks to resolve a politically fraught issue that has vexed several administrations and further cleaved apart Republicans and Democrats. This is Harris’ agenda.

FAUCI’S EMAILS | The efficacy of hydroxychloroquine, the origins of COVID-19 and the necessity of face masks were all topics at the center of Dr. Anthony Fauci’s emails in the early days of the pandemic. Here’s how Fauci’s private comments in newly released emails stack up with what he said in public.

AMERICAN HISTORY | The 1921 destruction in Tulsa wasn’t the first or the last race massacre that leveled homes, usurped land or destroyed livelihoods for Black Americans. USA TODAY’s Eileen Rivers created a searchable database of race massacres culled from numerous news reports, historical sites and encyclopedias. It reveals the depths of America’s struggle to live up to its principles of equality.

OLYMPICS | As Tokyo Olympics near, why has Japan been so slow to vaccinate its citizens? Roughly 8.7% of its 126 million residents had received at least one shot as of last week. Only 3% of the Japanese public is fully vaccinated. 

Coming soon

Simone Biles has done it again. And again. And again. And again. And again. And again. And again.

The star gymnast won her seventh U.S. championship on Sunday, proving once more that she is “so much better than everyone else,” writes USA TODAY’s Nancy Armour. “The Olympic trials are still three weeks away, and she can go ahead and buy her plane ticket for Tokyo now because, well, duh.”

(Don’t believe us? This slow-motion video of Biles’ floor routine is mesmerizing.)

But ahead of the Olympics (just 46 days away!) Biles isn’t the only athlete we’re watching. Get the latest Team USA, Olympics news in your inbox. Sign up here! 

Feel free to respond to this email, or you can reach me directly at [email protected].

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