Ethereum [ETH]’s Constantinople hard fork receives support from Koinex after Binance

In a recent report, Koinex, a popular Indian cryptocurrency exchange stated that the company will be supporting the much-discussed Ethereum [ETH] Constantinople hard fork. Koinex had tweeted:

“Announcement: We will be supporting the upcoming Ethereum Constantinople Hard Fork. The Hard Fork will take place when the block height is at 7,080,000 and the estimated date of the fork is 16th January 2019. Stay tuned for further updates.”

Koinex also hosts other popular cryptocurrencies like Tron [TRX], Stellar Lumens [XLM] and XRP. The announcement was met with excitement from the cryptocurrency community with many users applauding the cryptocurrency exchange’s move.

Koinex joins a league of other popular cryptocurrency exchange who have announced their support to the hardfork, a roster that also includes the Changpeng Zhao led Binance. The exchange even asked holders of the cryptocurrency to allocate enough time for deposits to be fully processed before the stipulated Constantinople block height is achieved. Binance said:

“We will handle all technical requirements involved for all users holding Ether in their Binance accounts. Hard Fork Block Height: 7,080,000Estimated Time: Between 2019/01/14 and 2019/01/18.”

The hardfork has been met with a lot of anticipation within the Ethereum user base, with some reports even saying that Constantinople might result in other hard forks too. Binance had further added:

“Should there be any other hard forks or airdrops during the Constantinople hard fork period, we invite these respective project teams to contact us at [email protected] for further discussion.”

The Constantinople hard fork was first discussed way back in 2017 during a developer and stakeholder meeting with a plan to launch in 2018. The launch in 2018 was further delayed due to problems on the Ropsten TestNet launch. During the Test, Lane Rettig, an independent Ethereum core developer had pointed out that there was a bug in the Parity implementation of the network. He further added:

“Apparently, in this case, there was some confusion over the meaning of terms like ‘transaction’ and ‘execution frame’ that may have contributed to the bug.”

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